State Profiles

Illinois’ Sex Education Snapshot

Advocates have taken significant action over the past seven years to advance sex education in Illinois, most recently cumulating in the passage of two proactive bills. House Bill 3299, introduced by Representative William Davis, requires developmental disability facilities to provide developmentally appropriate sex education and related resources to anyone admitted. House Bill 3550, introduced by Representative Ann Williams, requires sex education curriculum to include instruction on consent. In addition, House Bill 246, sponsored by Representative Anna Moeller, requires public schools to include the contributions of LGBT people in history courses, further demonstrating legislators’ increasing recognition of the importance of inclusive curriculum. House Bill 4007 is currently making its way through the Illinois General Assembly and if successful would require sex education curriculum to include age-appropriate discussion on sexting.

In 2013, legislators advanced sex education requirements through the passage of House Bill 2675, which requires sex education curriculum to include instruction on both abstinence as a responsible and positive decision and contraception. The amendment also requires curriculum to be medically accurate and developmentally/age appropriate.

While these legislative actions all mark significant advancements for sex education in Illinois, opponents, including the Illinois Family Institute, have routinely advocated to limit sex education. Such opposition enable the current patchwork landscape. Since Illinois schools are only required to provide limited instruction on abstinence and HIV/AIDS prevention, school districts are left to decide what type of sex education – if any at all — they provide to youth. If a school chooses to teach sex education, curriculum is required to be medically accurate and include instruction on both abstinence and contraception, consent, sexual abuse, assault awareness, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) prevention, and teach “honor and respect” for heterosexual marriage. Curriculum is not required to be comprehensive, culturally responsive to the needs of young people of color, or include instruction on sexual orientation or consent. Further, family life education courses are required to teach the alternatives to abortion. However, sex education curriculum must cover all potential pregnancy outcomes and include stigma-free information about abortion.

Mandating local control over sex education presents unique challenges that have resulted in a glaring disparity regarding the quality of sex education that students receive. Such discretion allows for the implementation of policies and curriculum that stigmatize marginalized youth, such as students of color and LGBTQ youth, and presents further challenges in ensuring that low income districts have access to the resources needed to implement comprehensive sex education.

Even among districts that mandate sex education, curriculum continues to vary. Although the Chicago Public Schools system mandates sex education, a recent report found that only 28 percent of Chicago schools taught all required sex education topics in all grade levels. Community members are currently working to further understand which schools fail to meet the city’s requirements.

To address the current gaps in education, organizations, such as the Illinois Caucus for Adolescent Health, offer youth workshops that meet the National Sexuality Education Standards. These workshops are facilitated by youth educators, adult educators, and theater artists. Right now, advocates can take action to ensure young people in their community have access to quality sex education. After contacting their local school board, advocates can determine what topics are missing from sex education, such as instruction that is culturally responsive to the needs of young people of color or instruction on topics including sexual orientation and gender identity. They can then vocalize the important need for advancing sex education requirements in their community. Further, advocates can contact their representatives to discuss the critical need for advancing comprehensive sex education requirements statewide. Advocates are encouraged to use the SIECUS Community Action Toolkit to guide local efforts to advance sex education.

State Sex Education Policies and Requirements at a Glance

  • Illinois schools are not required to teach sex education. However, they are required to provide instruction on human ecology and health, human growth and development, and the “psychological, physiological, hygienic, and social responsibilities of family life,” including discussion of abstinence and AIDS prevention.
  • Curriculum is not required to be comprehensive.
  • Curriculum must emphasize abstinence until marriage. However, curriculum must also place substantial emphasis on contraception if a school chooses to teach sex education.
  • Curriculum is not required to include instruction on sexual orientation or gender identity. However, curriculum must teach “honor and respect” for monogamous heterosexual marriage.
  • Curriculum must include instruction on consent.
  • Parents or guardians may remove their children from any or all sex education, family life programs, and/or STD/human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention programs. This is referred to as an “opt-out” policy.
  • Curriculum must be medically accurate.

State House Highlights

This section highlights sex education bills that were introduced during the 2020 state legislative session as well as bills that have been introduced thus far in 2021. These proposed bills​ provide a brief overview of both recent and current legislative action taken to advance or restrict sex education. For a more comprehensive look at relevant legislation concerning sex education and related topics such as reproductive health care, LGBTQ rights, and HIV/AIDS, continue reading on to the “State Legislative Activity” section of Illinois’ profile.

2021 Legislative Session 

House Bill 319 (pending): Aims to require the General Assembly to appropriate funding for evidence based sex education programming.

House Resolution 660 (failed): Sought to recognize that every student has the right to comprehensive sex education.

House Bill 3071 (pending): Aims to require schools, if they provide sex education, to teach comprehensive sex education. An identical, companion bill was introduced in the Senate.

House Bill 3274 (pending): Aims to require sex education to include instruction on human trafficking awareness in grades 6 through 12.

House Bill 5012 (failed): Sought to require schools to teach sex education that is comprehensive. An identical, companion bill was introduced in the Illinois Senate.

House Bill 4007 (failed): Sought to require sex education, if offered, to include age-appropriate discussion about the consequences of sexting.

House Bill 1736 (pending): Aims to require schools to provide comprehensive sex education. An identical, companion bill was introduced in the Illinois Senate.

Senate Bill 3788 (failed): Sought to require sex education to be comprehensive. Curriculum must include instruction on healthy relationships, understanding consent, scientifically accepted methods of pregnancy prevention and STI prevention, outcomes of pregnancy including parenting, adoption, and abortion, and effectiveness of prevention methods. This bill would also require curriculum to be responsive to the needs of students regardless of their gender identity, sexual orientation, parenting status, STI status, or if they are sexually active.

More on sex ed in Illinois…


State Law

The Illinois Critical Health Problems and Comprehensive Health Education Act states that the following topics must be addressed in all elementary and secondary schools:

[H]uman ecology and health, human growth and development; the emotional, psychological, physiological, hygienic, and social responsibilities of family life, including sexual abstinence until marriage; [and the] prevention and control of disease, including instruction in grades 6 through 12 on the prevention, transmission, and spread of [acquired immunodeficiency syndrome] AIDS.

As of 2013, schools that teach sex education are no longer required to emphasize that “abstinence is the expected norm” and are instead expected to teach both abstinence and contraception. All courses that discuss sexual intercourse are to address “the hazards of sexual intercourse . . . [and] the latest medical information citing the failure and success rates of condoms,” and include explanations of when it is “unlawful for males to have sexual relations with females under the age of 18.” Course material must also include information regarding responsible parenting.

In 2014, the Illinois State Board of Education published Public Act 98-0441 to provide further details on state sex education requirements.

In 2018, Illinois enrolled Public Act 100-0684, requiring sex education instruction to include discussion on consent, sexual harassment, and sexual assault; and Public Act 100-1043, requiring the State Board of Education to implement a pilot program including instruction on parenting education for grades 9-12, which may be included in sex education classes.

Illinois law also provides guidelines for family life education courses. These courses are “designed to promote wholesome and comprehensive understanding of the emotional, psychological, physiological, hygienic, and social responsibility aspects of family life,” and therefore must “include the teaching of the alternatives to abortion, appropriate to the various grade levels.”

The Illinois Superintendent of Education must prepare the course of instruction for family life education, make it available to school districts, and “develop a procedure for evaluating and measuring the effectiveness of the family life courses of instruction in each local school district, including the setting of reasonable goals for reduced sexual activity, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and premarital pregnancy.”

Parents or guardians may remove their children from any or all sex education, family life programs, and/or STD/human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention programs. This is referred to as an “opt-out” policy.

State Standards

The Illinois Learning Standards for Physical Development and Health was updated in 2014 but does not provide curriculum guidance for sex education and only briefly mentions that students should be able to “explain the basic functions of the reproductive system” by grade eight and “demonstrate basic knowledge of HIV and AIDS.” The Standards also address effective communication and decision-making skills.

State Legislative Activity

State legislative activity related to sex education does not take place in isolation from the broader embroiled political and policy climate. Attacks on the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, or questioning (LGBTQ) individuals, and efforts to limit access to abortion care and other reproductive health care services prevent students from receiving comprehensive sex education and accessing sexual and reproductive health care services.  Below are highlights of current legislative activity related to these topics. The Illinois General Assembly is organized in a two-year cycle called a biennium. The 2021-2022 session convened January 13, 2021. 

 

TitleDescriptionStatusLegislative Topic
House Bill 24 Requires sex education to include age appropriate instruction on sexting, including the consequences of sexting. Enacted (2021) Sex Education https://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/33609f266545a38e480099b473360064d2216ff36b388885780296d6e64c38765f58cc76db649e53e980de09f6f3684f
House Bill 319Requires the General Assembly to appropriate funding for evidence sex education programming. Re-referred to Rules Committee (2021) Sex Education https://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/44d91d0bd03490e2d65d813e47e4b3746c236c0ebfe53232ff027493977eb2d7f7c538c27f46925e0747c7ac63d7348b
House Bill 827Prohibits "partial-birth" abortion. Re-referred to Rules Committee (2021) Reproductive Health Care https://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/ccbf7201941f0db98f752ef1343d685fbc4ebad8a7b797d4dedba655bc729b3cee3a649452c318a25f944ff7530d3a2c
House Bill 1736Requires schools to teach comprehensive sex education. Re-referred to Rules Committee (2021) Sex Education https://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/33933da89d41d6f86848291613b618efaf8d9343a4f23c95679a0f25202734009d72f76aa9162428235481397d26a24d
House Bill 1797Repeals the requirement for medical professionals to provide parental notification when a minor obtains an abortion. Re-referred to Rules Committee (2021) Reproductive Health Care https://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/acc557dd2f593bfdc21448293eeb2d192d0389cfae3ce0645b6b45bf15b270efcf81c12251c067503f15b589cab79097
House Bill 3043Prohibits abortion unless it is deemed necessary by a physician. However, no abortions shall be performed if the fetus is deemed viable unless in the case of a medical emergency. Referred to the House Committee on Rules (2021) Reproductive Health Care https://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/8b424c799d9ff19aef191bca55d61413863a28039651d08cf92b5f18987524310e1eadb370ce0f2fb59348cb6ab426af
House Bill 3046 Prohibits abortion unless it is deemed necessary by the physician. However, no abortions shall be performed if the fetus has been determined to be viable unless in the case of a medical emergency. Re-referred to Rules Committee(2021) Reproductive Health Care https://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/49dfd14c555ac4160cceab2c837d3a1bb698fbc2b8010d1d68f52ae28bf7f771b754067fa1216f711121171acb832164
House Bill 3071If a school provides sex education, curriculum must be comprehensive. Re-referred to Rules Committee (2021) Sex Education https://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/9103a7f6460795805e7fb5df99196c0daa640c613f3becc635465c8320fc78506c4fe72b3fbd2d515c6d85abfd5cfd7d
House Bill 3274Requires sex education to include human trafficking awareness education in grades 6 through 12. Re-referred to Rules Committee (2021) Sex Education https://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/e1fb7be675fd998f9d847183f961687a06d447a4c0f7eb68d871786222bc762da023100121bf464eace89e77e1e20795
House Bill 3535Implements a students bill of rights stating that no student may be discriminated against on the basis of race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, socioeconomic status, or mental, physical, developmental, or sensory disability. Re-referred to Rules Committee (2021) Sexual Orientation and Gender Identityhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/be3d9d131bd83dfd35fbbb341f291de31e1c50a3b0ee883bb7a855449c72ca7d6ed9636e0f2de43679953100c79c3742
Senate Bill 647 Requires schools to teach comprehensive sex education. Re-referred to Assignments (2021) Sex Education https://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/ac9f2159e5941490b3c8aa8e7dd78134c1efc0df11b20f6f141b4240efccf1a9c6b4cf0e0595de0171ff1161c9ea23dd
Senate Bill 266If a school provides sex education, curriculum must be comprehensive. Re-referred to Assignments (2021) Sex Education https://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/17f644231838f7ee3039415d1cba04d2578b4825772a2394be19c5118ecf9d7149744a43b7be076305c062de3c88f838
Senate Bill 818 Requires school districts that provide sexuality education to teach comprehensive sex education and requires each regional educational service center to appoint a comprehensive personal health and safety education and comprehensive sexual health education advisory board.Enacted (2021) Sex Education https://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/ab02bb6070a36326c5f4146278249607cac4feac4bce7e909e40909ba89f5ed3ed3a941c7406b34aa1d91cca5c278d58
House Bill 246Requires that textbooks purchased through the textbook block grant program must be non-discriminatory and include the roles and contributions of LGBT people in history. Enacted (2019)Sexual Orientation and Gender Identityhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/5b2e10d2faf0a75b1f0da1af8a9adb6b62df926987cd4d8d9192eb201d7931a4c640f40ff65db92f36d5e9c38d0ed27a
House Resolution 660Recognizes that every student has the right to comprehensive sex education. Died in the House Committee on Elementary & Secondary Education: School Curriculum and Policies (2020)Sex Educationhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/d68a8a8488119cbae8bdbe41413592fc8fcdaea0a85510db9cbc9654ad4b1cef8a1a612ea1a6005852af5823f4bab29a
House Bill 2467Permits minors to obtain an abortion without the written consent of a parent or guardian. Died in the House Committee on Rules (2020)Permits minors to obtain an abortion without the written consent of a parent or guardian. https://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/cdb8d50464bd4aeff8fd5e3b80fc16b8d28109a7e5efe2c83570985abc209a3db339ba7b826c366ad1dd0115d90c751b
House Bill 3515Prohibits physicians from providing gender affirming care, including surgery or hormones, to minors.Died in the House Committee on Rules (2020)Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity https://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/af93935d32f170e17880c61cb89ab55b9bc3cd5983c3aea46bd1646c742b2c60c2760e2ede85cf9ebdf05857a756905c
House Bill 3850Repeals the Reproductive Health Act and prohibits abortion after the fetus is determined to be viable.Died in the House Committee on Rules (2019)Reproductive Health Carehttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/1da7ffb9531d18725523dc9a12f2a9be8a5e5afc8b67401580d26d4916acd3e54f7fd5af07165ace3d91753e0454ab2e
House Bill 4007Requires sex education curriculum to include age-appropriate discussion of sexting. Died in the House Committee on Rules(2020)Sex Educationhttp://www.ilga.gov/legislation/fulltext.asp?DocName=&SessionId=108&GA=101&DocTypeId=HB&DocNum=4007&GAID=15&LegID=&SpecSess=&Session=
House Bill 5012Requires schools to teach sex education that is comprehensive.Died in the Rules Committee (2020)Sex Educationhttp://www.ilga.gov/legislation/billstatus.asp?DocNum=5012&GAID=15&GA=101&DocTypeID=HB&LegID=125239&SessionID=108
House Bill 5295Prohibits abortion after 20 weeks. Died in the House Committee on Rules (2020)Reproductive Health Carehttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/a60d680ea9c77b2aa1ca3d05997b60b0df1456579a9b4787db0d469cf494f2eadb006a29eef0c30235c444b2601a8ad3
Senate Bill 3788Requires sex education to include instruction on healthy relationships, understanding consent, scientifically accepted methods of pregnancy prevention and STI prevention, outcomes of pregnancy including parenting, adoption, and abortion, and effectiveness of prevention methods. also requires curriculum to be responsive to the needs of students regardless of their gender identity, sexual orientation, parenting status, STI status, or if they are sexually active.Died in the Senate Committee on Assignments (2020)Sex Educationhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/6a8916e5b46c2972b0e287b717605299849b954148e35ae29aab4f040783fc3b4a4d8a1cdfeb54c06b2198982e98e5dd
House Bill 2058Establishes a 20 week abortion ban. Died in the House Committee on Rules (2019)Reproductive Health Carehttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/19363a4cc359d1a8739135fd7444837a9c75d59d135020d219fbb16fdf47b1ed3e5814884a7de6d4d41312ed65530f39
House Bill 2281Prohibits abortion based on the fetus’s race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, or diagnosis or potential diagnosis of the fetus having Down syndrome or any other disability. Died in the House Committee on Rules (2019)Reproductive Health Carehttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/db9f8c0657a2d1913e3a61d835329f7054f1909ee98c9f476f944b4ac01c4fd8fcae227121605cc2ef1e4ea3509daecd
House Bill 2384Prohibits abortion after the fetus is determined to be viable. Died in the House Committee on Rules (2019)Reproductive Health Carehttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/07fe39bf34ea2c6eb360150755404a62ef48f24b33004439521454f2e5b3a7d22a9b4188e0daf1f066dcdd56eabdd6fa
House Bill 2495Establishes the fundamental right of individuals to make decisions about their reproductive healthcare, including the right to use or refuse reproductive healthcare. Died in the House Committee on Rules (2019)Reproductive Health Carehttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/abbd4536db8560049dd1c4a908a760a47a9c7d22c37fe8b7064e26fe052dad7be814555b1a23db6a657c4aa082a411dc
House Bill 2820Requires sex education curriculum to include age-appropriate instruction on consent.Tabled in the House (2019)Sex Educationhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/a85ad52aa15c058d52303237dafba396753443cd25e69d4a977486a9b6f5270a0820ac49d13052b022ba62b11589e78d
House Bill 3071Requires developmental disability facilities to provide developmentally appropriate sex education and related resources to anyone admitted.Died in the House Committee on Rules (2019)Sex Educationhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/6280e3280471b53b5fa0902a46de148ed4fe2e24cadaa6fa65e8afbbcee2d8e9182319f053f01826b98c215d4b951c45
House Bill 3158Establishes a 20 week abortion ban. Died in the House Committee on Rules (2019)Reproductive Health Carehttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/7c6e662a5fca1a6e831b9d50d4b30117e12057d72a843d30e0e386064b8a3e9fe0c735038567f59e5359381f1b4c93d0
House Bill 3299Requires developmental disability facilities to provide developmentally appropriate sex education and related resources to anyone admitted.Enacted (2019)Sex Educationhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/81884a9fbe83af70e29fd3c051e04e59c6aba1cf9414f546ea6e57438b479464aac0ac0bec9df9a4779c11b2860bade5
House Bill 3515Prohibits physicians from prescribing hormones for the purpose of hormone replacement therapy, puberty suppressants, or performing gender affirmation surgery. Died in the House Committee on Rules (2020)Sexual Orientation and Gender Identityhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/af93935d32f170e17880c61cb89ab55b9bc3cd5983c3aea46bd1646c742b2c60c2760e2ede85cf9ebdf05857a756905c
House Bill 3550Requires sex education curriculum to include age-appropriate instruction on consent. Enacted (2019)Sex Educationhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/3c1e217f89e317082200118eb69d7736723c438c8f1165d757b93fea86c2d947db03d04cc61dba8dd6b8a33a045f28ce
Senate Bill 25Establishes the fundamental right of individuals to make decisions about their reproductive healthcare, including the right to use or refuse reproductive healthcare. Enacted (2019)Reproductive Health Carehttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/f5c6ce5cc20deb772c1b0529e65f40e0a503a498d59c2a43562c168bb5a7af266c0dc6128e382f31803da0e62656ce90
Senate Bill 78Requires that textbooks purchased through the textbook block grant program must be non-discriminatory and include the roles and contributions of LGBT people in history. Died in the Senate Committee on Assignments (2019)Sexual Orientation and Gender Identityhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/0cc927a37c990a3c142d29c952509f8239380ade7ff06bf35b2d16de8385484e4e97bef494affea5cb04e905db833ea5
Senate Bill 1942Establishes the fundamental right of individuals to make decisions about their reproductive healthcare, including the right to use or refuse reproductive healthcare.Died in the Senate Committee on Assignments (2019)Reproductive Health Carehttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/0205753901ebb9ed3a8eb36c692658c7f80d2b707a5bc1d73162ee0fe9ced834a74c02487f85c230bcc428a96b96d181

Youth Sexual Health Data

Young people are more than their health behaviors and outcomes. While data can be a powerful tool to demonstrate the sex education and sexual health care needs of young people, it is important to be mindful that these behaviors and outcomes are impacted by systemic inequities present in our society that affect an individual’s sexual health and well-being. To learn more about Illinois’ Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) results, click here.

Illinois School Health Profiles Data 

In 2019, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released the School Health Profiles, which measure school health policies and practices and highlight which health topics were taught in schools across the country. Since the data were collected from self-administered questionnaires completed by schools’ principals and lead health education teachers, the CDC notes that one limitation of the School Health Profiles is bias toward the reporting of more positive policies and practices. In the School Health Profiles, the CDC identifies 20 sexual health education topics as critical for ensuring a young person’s sexual health. Below are key instruction highlights for secondary schools in Illinois as reported for the 2017–2018 school year.

Reported teaching all 20 critical sexual health education topics

  • 17% of Illinois secondary schools taught students all 20 critical sexual health education topics in a required course in any of grades 6, 7, or 8.
  • 44.8% of Illinois secondary schools taught students all 20 critical sexual health education topics in a required course in any of grades 9, 10, 11, or 12.

Reported teaching about the benefits of being sexually abstinent

  • 87.3% of Illinois secondary schools taught students about the benefits of being sexually abstinent in a required course in any of grades 6, 7, or 8.
  • 99.2% of Illinois secondary schools taught students about the benefits of being sexually abstinent in a required course in any of grades 9, 10, 11, or 12.

Reported teaching how to access valid and reliable information, products, and services related to HIV, other STDs, and pregnancy

  • 74.7% of Illinois secondary schools taught students how to access valid and reliable information, products, and services related to HIV, other STDs, and pregnancy in a required course in any of grades 6, 7, or 8.
  • 95.8% of Illinois secondary schools taught students how to access valid and reliable information, products, and services related to HIV, other STDs, and pregnancy in a required course in any of grades 9, 10, 11, or 12.

Reported teaching how to create and sustain healthy and respectful relationships

  • 88.4% of Illinois secondary schools taught students how to create and sustain healthy and respectful relationships in a required course in any of grades 6, 7, or 8.
  • 99.1% of Illinois secondary schools taught students how to create and sustain healthy and respectful relationships in a required course in any of grades 9, 10, 11, or 12.

Reported teaching about preventive care that is necessary to maintain reproductive and sexual health

  • 66.6% of Illinois secondary schools taught students about preventive care that is necessary to maintain reproductive and sexual health in a required course in any of grades 6, 7, or 8.
  • 94.9% of Illinois secondary schools taught students about preventive care that is necessary to maintain reproductive and sexual health in a required course in any of grades 9, 10, 11, or 12.

Reported teaching how to correctly use a condom

  • 27.5% of Illinois secondary schools taught students how to correctly use a condom in a required course in any of grades 6, 7, or 8.
  • 73.3% of Illinois secondary schools taught students how to correctly use a condom in a required course in any of grades 9, 10, 11, or 12.

Reported teaching about methods of contraception other than condoms

  • 52.1% of Illinois secondary schools taught students about methods of contraception other than condoms in a required course in any of grades 6, 7, or 8.
  • 92.4% of Illinois secondary schools taught students about methods of contraception other than condoms in a required course in any of grades 9, 10, 11, or 12.

Reported teaching about sexual orientation

  • 34.4% of Illinois secondary schools taught students about sexual orientation in a required course in any of grades 6, 7, or 8.
  • 61% of Illinois secondary schools taught students about sexual orientation in a required course in any of grades 9, 10, 11, or 12.

Reported teaching about gender roles, gender identity, or gender expression

  • 33.5% of Illinois secondary schools taught students about gender roles, gender identity, or gender expression in a required course in any of grades 6, 7, or 8.
  • 64.9% of Illinois secondary schools taught students about gender roles, gender identity, or gender expression in a required course in any of grades 9, 10, 11, or 12.

Reported providing curricula or supplementary materials relevant to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning (LGBTQ) youth 

  • 46.6% of Illinois secondary schools provided students with curricula or supplementary materials that included HIV, STD, or pregnancy prevention information relevant to LGBTQ youth.

(Visit the CDC’s School Health Profiles report for additional information on school health policies and practices.)

***The quality of sex education taught often reflects funding available for sex education programs. To learn more about federal funding streams, click here.

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