State Profiles

Florida’s Sex Education Snapshot

The State of Sex Education

Advocates have been fighting a fierce and uphill battle to advance sex education in Florida in recent years, most recently introducing a series of progressive bills in 2022. These bills, which seek to require schools that provide sex education to teach comprehensive and culturally responsive instruction  (House Bill 1409 and Senate Bill 1936), are a significant effort to advance sex education requirements statewide. These efforts persist despite an opposing movement to shift Florida’s current opt-out policy to opt-in, which could create an additional barrier to accessing sex education. Further, efforts are underway that perpetuate attacks on LGBTQ+ youth in schools with the introduction of bills such as Senate Bill 1834/House Bill 1557, commonly referred to as “Don’t Say Gay” bills, of which the latter was enacted. This now prohibits classroom discussion on sexual orientation and gender identity in primary grade levels.

In 2021, Florida  enacted the restrictive House Bill 241 on June 29. This bill mandates that school districts enact a procedure for parents to object to instructional materials on the basis of morality, sex, religion, or perceived harm. This law also requires prior parental notification of instruction and the development of a procedure for parents to opt their children out of sex education. This bill reinforces stigma and shame surrounding the provision of school-based sex education, inciting fear and concern in parents about critical and necessary instruction that their children receive. Under this law, health care providers must also receive parental consent before providing minors with care, preventing access to confidential and supportive health services. Additionally, Florida enacted House Bill 519 and House Bill 545, which have a mixed impact on sex education in the state. House Bill 519 requires K-12 health education to be age-appropriate, developmentally appropriate, and include instruction on the prevention of child sexual abuse. However, the law requires curriculum to include an awareness of the benefits of abstinence as the expected standard, along with the consequences of teenage pregnancy. House Bill 545, enacted on June 4, mandates school districts to notify parents of the right to remove their children from sex education and provide the opportunity for parents to review instructional materials. The law also mandates that all sex education instructional materials are annually approved by the district school board in an open notice public meeting.

Sex education is not currently mandated in Florida. Schools that do teach sex education must emphasize abstinence as the expected social standard. Since Florida schools are not required to provide sex education to students, school districts are left to decide what type of sex education–if any at all–they provide to youth. Local control over sex education presents unique challenges that have resulted in a glaring disparity regarding the quality of sex education that students receive. Such discretion allows for the implementation of policies and curriculum that stigmatize marginalized youth, such as students of color and LGBTQ youth, and presents further challenges in ensuring that low income districts have access to the resources needed to implement comprehensive sex education. While some districts, such as Putnam County, mandate comprehensive sex education, others, such as St. John’s County, mandate abstinence only instruction. Regardless of how advanced a particular district’s curriculum may be, state statute mandates that HIV/AIDS instruction emphasize the benefits of heterosexual marriage. This requirement is particularly harmful to vulnerable LGBTQ youth.

Many parents and community members have spoken out against unsatisfactory curriculum, such as parents in Hillsborough and Pinellas counties. These parents began speaking out in 2019 against a curriculum that fails to provide enough information to their children. It has been reported that the religious organization More2Life, linked to a Florida-based crisis pregnancy center (CPCs), is approved to teach abstinence only curriculum in Pinellas County. CPCs rely on deceptive messaging to draw in individuals trying to access reputable reproductive health care services and provide false, manipulative information about abortion care. Unfortunately, crisis pregnancy centers have increasingly received federal funding to deliver abstinence-only instruction nationwide. It has been reported that More2Life’s presentation includes a metaphor that compares sex to a fire, arguing that it is only safe within the context of marriage–similar to fire only being safe when it burns in a fireplace.

Right now, advocates can take action to ensure young people in their community have access to quality sex education. After identifying what topics are missing from local sex education requirements, advocates can vocalize the importance of implementing specific elements of comprehensive sex education, such as trauma informed, culturally responsive curriculum that addresses the needs of youth of color and includes instruction on topics such as sexual orientation and gender identity, consent, healthy relationships, and contraceptive options. Advocates are encouraged to take action on pending legislation that seeks to advance or restrict the principles of comprehensive sex education. For a current overview of pending legislation, see table below. Additionally, reach out to EducateUs to get connected to local advocacy groups. Community members can also advocate for a local mandate that requires sex education to be medically accurate. Further, advocates can also contact their representatives to discuss the critical need for a statewide sex education requirement or discuss the potential for introducing legislation that requires specific elements included in comprehensive sex education to be taught. Advocates are encouraged to use the SIECUS Community Action Toolkit to guide local efforts to advance sex education.

State Sex Education Policies and Requirements at a Glance

  • Florida schools are not required to teach sex education. However, they are required to teach comprehensive health education that includes instruction on teenage pregnancy.
    • Curriculum is not required to be comprehensive.
    • Curriculum must include the benefits of abstinence as the expected social standard.
    • Curriculum is not required to include instruction on consent. 
    • Florida has no regulation regarding medically accurate sex education instruction.
  • If a school chooses to teach further instruction on HIV/AIDS, instruction must emphasize the benefits of heterosexual marriage.
  • Parents or guardians may submit a written request to remove their children from instruction on reproductive health or any disease. This is referred to as an “opt-out” policy.

State House Highlights

This section highlights sex education bills that were introduced during the 2021 state legislative session as well as bills that have been introduced thus far in 2022. These proposed bills ​provide a brief overview of both recent and current legislative action taken to advance or restrict sex education. For a more comprehensive look at relevant legislation concerning sex education and related topics such as reproductive health care, LGBTQ rights, racial equity and justice, parental rights, bullying and harassment, mental health, assault and violence prevention, and HIV/STIs as it impacts youth, continue reading on to the “State Legislative Activity” section of Florida’s profile.

2022 Legislative Session

Senate Bill 1842 (failed): Requires schools to notify and request written consent of parents before teaching reproductive health or about sexually transmitted infections at least 10 instructional days prior to and prohibiting a student from receiving such teaching without the written consent

House Bill 1409 (failed): Requires schools that provide instruction on human sexuality to provide comprehensive, medically accurate, developmentally appropriate instruction and allows for opt-out procedure for students if written parental consent is provided. An identical companion bill was introduced in the Senate.

Senate Bill 1936 (failed): Removes requirement to emphasize abstinence in AIDS education and creates the Florida Healthy Adolescent Act which would require public schools that have instruction on human sexuality to provide comprehensive, medically accurate, age-appropriate, information. An identical, companion bill was introduced in the House.

2021 Legislative Session 

House Bill 241 (enacted): Establishes the “Parents’ Bill of Rights”, requiring each school board to establish procedures for a parent to object to instructional materials on the basis of beliefs concerning mortality, sex, religion, or that the materials are harmful. The bill also requires prior parental notification of instruction and the development of a procedure for parents to opt their children out of sex education, establishes the right of parents to opt their children out of any district-level data collection, and prohibits health care practitioners from providing or arranging to provide health care services to a minor prior to receiving parental consent. An identical, companion bill was introduced in the Senate.

House Bill 519 (enacted): Requires comprehensive health education to be age-appropriate, evidence-based, and developmentally appropriate. Further requires health education to include instruction on the prevention of child sexual abuse, exploitation, and human trafficking. Additionally, curriculum must include an awareness of the benefits of sexual abstinence as the expected standard and the consequences of teenage pregnancy. An identical, companion bill was introduced in the Senate.

House Bill 545 (enacted): Prohibits a person from selling or renting specified materials to a minor for monetary consideration; providing that a public school student may be exposed to certain teaching only if they have significant literary, artistic, political, or scientific value for minors. Requires school districts or specified schools to notify parents of the right to remove their children from sex education and provide the opportunity to review the instructional materials. Mandates that all sex education instructional materials are approved on an annual basis by the district school board in an open notice public meeting An identical, companion bill was introduced in the Senate.

House Bill 1303 (failed): Aims to require health education to include instruction on the dangers and signs of human trafficking.

More on sex ed in Florida…


State Law

Florida Statute 48-1003.42 states that public schools must teach comprehensive health education that includes giving students “an awareness of the benefits of sexual abstinence as the expected standard and the consequences of teenage pregnancy.” State policy reads that “course descriptions for comprehensive health education shall not interfere with the local determination of appropriate curriculum, which reflects local values and concerns.” Curriculum must include a teen dating violence component.

Florida Statute 48-1003.46 states that each district school board
may provide instruction in acquired immune deficiency syndrome education as a specific area of health education. Such instruction may include, but is not limited to, the known modes of transmission, signs and symptoms, risk factors associated with acquired immune deficiency syndrome, and means used to control the spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Such instruction shall:

  1. Teach abstinence from sexual activity outside of marriage as the expected standard for all school-age students, while teaching the benefits of monogamous, heterosexual marriage;
  2. Emphasize that abstinence from sexual activity is a certain way to avoid out-of-wedlock pregnancy, STIs, including AIDS and other associated health problems;
  3. Teach that each student has the power to control personal behavior and encourage students to base actions on reasoning, self-esteem, and respect for others; and
  4. Provide instruction and material that is appropriate for the grade and age of the student.

Parents may submit a written request to the school principal to exempt their child from “the teaching of reproductive health or any disease, including HIV/AIDS, its symptoms, development, and treatment.” This is referred to as an “opt-out” policy.

State Standards

Florida standards, titled Sunshine State Standards for Health Education, were revised in 2021. The benchmarks include examples that can be taught to achieve competency, but the examples are neither prescriptive nor limiting. Examples of what can be taught include, “HIV by sexual transmission,” and “contracting [STDs] through sexual relationships.” Florida provides example curricula that schools can adopt to fulfill their comprehensive health education requirement. One of these programs, Health Opportunities through Physical Education (HOPE), includes instruction on “human sexuality, including abstinence and HIV.” Florida also maintains a detailed database of health education standards online and provides further guidance on curricula and instruction.

State Legislative Activity

State legislative activity related to sex education does not take place in isolation from the broader embroiled political and policy climate. Attacks on the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, or questioning (LGBTQ) individuals, attempts to restrict or prohibit instruction on “divisive concepts” such as Critical Race Theory, and efforts to limit access to abortion care and other reproductive health care services  prevent students from receiving comprehensive sex education and accessing sexual and reproductive health care services. Below are  highlights of current legislative activity related to these topics. Florida’s 2022 legislative session convened January 11, 2022.

TitleDescriptionStatusLegislative Topic
House Bill 1467Establishes term limits for school board members and requires certain meetings relating to instructional materials to be noticed and open to the public. Revises requirements for the department relating to the development of training programs for the selection of materials used in schools and library media centers and revises district school board requirements for the selection and adoption of certain materialsEnacted (2022)Parental Rights & Curriculum Transparencyhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/b35a72847b78a771e51f8ffb1c5916b43de3b3d0a992684fb656d3b979ea8227faafc3695dc0c4e8862db5885144a685
Senate Joint Resolution 244Changes Florida school board elections from non partisan to partisanDied in Education Committee (2022)Parental Rights & Curriculum Transparencyhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/6cf2016b3d9e3a4b71cd12bfd43380b349888a5e48f638df867029589db18e1e039e4a551ed11d01787bd9e3d86bd556
House Joint Resolution 35Changes Florida school board elections from non partisan to partisanDied in Secondary Education & Career Development Subcommittee (2022)Parental rights & Curriculum Transparencyhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/a40fdffb7e770de2302771481c34eea22f81e5d7dc4ee98582fdbdd539a5449a1e993c31f75ceab181ac527780242b4d
Senate Bill 212Repeals harmful transgender youth sports ban that was enacted in the last sessionDied in Health Policy (2022)Sexual Orientation and Gender Identityhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/a670e23cd144c43c5dada3488df00d4a265c6b1cac083be45754d9bae3250ee4a3e3445740355ecd280696d8a2a026a6
House Bill 6065Repeals harmful transgender youth sports ban that was enacted in the last sessionDied in Secondary Education & Career Development Subcommittee (2022)Sexual Orientation & Gender Identityhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/e031ba24eb05742af62d21744ab5863bfd095044ceb18ee646ee4acab7ab9082b4fcd2582019a41584fbebb63a289481
Senate Bill 1820Allows for health care providers and insurers to deny patient health care on basis of religious, moral, or ethical beliefsDied in Health Policy Committee (2022)Sexual Orientation & Gender Identityhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/6167583af14fdfda5592d7338c955e67b92d8d2af2658a4e0b1c0cb769a33a329affe3d96c5d8c8b1a99c46b75ac5a50
House Bill 747Allows for health care providers and insurers to deny patient health care on basis of religious, moral, or ethical beliefsDied in Judiciary Committee (2022)Sexual Orientation & Gender Identityhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/84112f50eab9c374a44ee96f4037ef8122d7a5d732ca5412aec28f01f4710a9947a0f8e5b73db17456552d002af5fb7c
Senate Bill 1184Prohibits actions such as revoking the license of a health practioner for "free speech" unless direct physical harm can be proven, promoting conversion therapyDied in Judiciary Committee (2022)Sexual Orientation & Gender Identityhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/38d072b51513495ea00529b0d68a4f8b3df8cc4b2a494f15cf90b87b69fbea345ebe56a4b19e20376d09ec0d8b9c3949
House Bill 7Utilizes "divisive concepts" language and prohibits it in employment and education systemPassed Legislature (2022)Racial Equity and Justicehttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/a1aaf251749c27d3c0c7236a740884326ee82afb4369c840bb8668a5d62c4c3aa8a7110b49d5ed90d2c0f6b5369351de
Senate Bill 148Prohibits instruction on principles similar to "divisive concepts" outlined in other billsDied in Rules Committee (2022)Racial Equity and Justicehttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/a715df7e6e0cb795582dd75b3b25f99a7586a6af345b77d299b188c48711e6a8c2ca94efeca3a0c6ebb0edc64cd04e43
Senate Bill 1870Ensures that state of Florida and Dept. of Health funds are not used towards the provision of conversion therapy and creates the Florida Coordinating Council on Conversion Therapy which will develop strategies to prevent the use of conversion therapy on minorsDied in Health Policy; Children, Families, and Elder Affairs Committee (2022)Sexual Orientation & Gender Identityhttps://www.flsenate.gov/Session/Bill/2022/1870/BillText/Filed/HTML
Senate Bill 1936Removes requirement to emphasize abstinence in AIDS education and creates the Florida Healthy Adolescent Act which would require public schools that have instruction on human sexuality to provide comprehensive, medically accurate, age-appropriate, informationDied in Education; Children, Families, and Elder Affairs Committee (2022)Sex Educationhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/83f6806c67c6d990887970148854f19d95753a9c188ce9818d2da10621b92cc8d2436a3c7c0628ceae90cf2155986c5e
House Bill 1409Requires schools that provide instruction on human sexuality to provide comprehensive, medically accurate, developmentally appropriate instruction and allows for opt-out procedure for students if written parental consent is providedDied in Secondary Education & Career Development Subcommittee (2022)Sex Educationhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/f9aa5dade1f801a6340a4f632d04f81c557f92065c81a3b3ae9ebe24e556e4ae6055472058e33715e77efbbdf56dfe9b
House Bill 1557Requires schools to adopt procedures for parental notification and prohibits confidentiality from parents regarding Their Child. Additionally, it prohibits classroom discussion on sexual orientation and gender identity in primary grade levelsEnacted (2022)Parental Rights & Curriculum Transparency / Sexual Orientation & Gender Identityhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/edd3e0100d174165c3e88617404850eaf9583f69156837e7bf17d082e0d64a9197365b408129c26664258ed61327defd
Senate Bill 1834Requires school districts to adopt procedures to ensure parental notification for specific instruction and reinforces the right of parents to make decisions regarding upbringing and education of their child. This would also prohibit schools from maintaining confidentiality of students from their parents and also prohibits classroom discussion on sexual orientation and gender identity in primary grade levels.Died in Education Committee (2022)Parental Rights & Curriculum Transparencyhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/ba4d70e7f8692355d55f362ed190920bad54a53faf8f6f89b130ba211f037b31ad3eb4a298da517d350c5b43af49f900
Senate Bill 1842Requires schools to notify and request written consent of parents before teaching reproductive health or about sexually transmitted infections at least 10 instructional days prior to and prohibiting a student from receiving such teaching without the written consentDied in Committee on Health Policy Committee (2022)Sex Educationhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/4a13751ef99225fa0a637029e08270befda8b0cda78ec0117d05af9e8a3715988147f089227b46fd2cc99ea7f8d271e0
House Bill 1305Requires schools to obtain written consent from parents prior to instruction on reproductive health and changes definition on what is considered "obscene" material for instruction and prohibits their use in classroom or libraries.Died in Early Learning & Elementary Education Subcommittee (2022)Parental Rights & Curriculum Transparencyhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/33c606847ca2849fa956605fb869ef8b3ea97489caa49cd3047b75cddebf23946a97eaaddbfabda4e7152153048f56d1
Senate Bill 1684Creates process for parents for taking action on any infringement of parental rights relating to the upbringing, education, health care, and mental health of their childrenDied in Judiciary Committee (2022)Parental Rights & Curriculum Transparencyhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/31a1b5d75775e28d1ae4a58f072928972e75eeae03510ead4d0aba0ca3eb0eeab3afa6fb5bbb2f97bdd57b4c3608ed46
Senate Bill 490Requires instruction on Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) history in schoolsDied in Appropriations Subcommittee on Education (2022)Racial Equity and Justicehttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/b84d166d02dde29716648f9bd42d97e4f4db4d343c6738dd7b02eeed9e204d25f4fb06278f3d795972844cdbe6a7be8f
Senate Bill 242Prohibits instruction on divisive concepts as a part of training or curriculum for school employees and students in K-20 institutionsDied in Judiciary Committee (2022)Racial Equity and Justicehttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/b0ab0655dca74257c2f8368147e12409875a00dae66cc6e456f33495102cda81b9deffc47c0776ac3a792ec36796d5d4
House Bill 167Prohibits abortion once a fetal heartbeat is detected.Referred to the House Committee on Professions & Public Health Subcommittee (2022)Reproductive Health Carehttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/158736b8123b663aa1948ec6f274613356416ab78ebe5b95ee1ecb53b0daf518b840ba4cd013a3854d44d8213658ab8b
House Bill 241 Enacts the Parents Bill of Rights, which outlines the fundamental rights of a parent to direct the upbringing, education, health care, and mental health of their children. This includes the ability to object to curriculum related to sexuality and the right to remove their child from any sex education instruction. Prohibits health care providers from providing care without parental consent. Enacted (2021) Sex Education https://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/f4c94d689148faf64e9a9bc88a434c45c0ee44a63b70d9acd453fa69964db5fa51de5094e5541dc049c0d8cd0ee3a3f4
House Bill 301 Prohibits health care providers from performing conversion therapy on minors. Died in Professions & Public Health Subcommittee (2021) Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity https://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/9bac419f8b90d55aa6a9a97f30d0d5f297751e2b234e22fc2291ada10346bc4f8b829c793a3559e4fcf8ce5144e3934c
House Bill 351 Prohibits abortion if it is determined if the fetus is capable of feeling pain unless in the case of a medical emergency. Died in Professions & Public Health Subcommittee (2021) Reproductive Health Care https://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/feb2ba57ee275b7f0b1c8fafcc5d7073a5a2b94fe17bd1329320a00c143962b93e1e036006c2ebe3878fe16bbe28eb36
House Bill 519 Requires comprehensive health education to be age appropriate, evidence based, and developmentally appropriate. Requires curriculum to include instruction child sexual abuse, exploitation, and human trafficking. Requires curriculum to include an awareness of the benefits of sexual abstinence as the expected standard and the consequences of teenage pregnancy. Enacted (2021) Sex Education https://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/37fcf7b65ae98d5f3cc05bb3c03e65e5a5570cb5ff14a148393638f8b399ae773f25a321e29f7afe28d45b85a5dc7c78
Senate Bill 744 Prohibits abortion if it is determined the fetus is capable of feeling pain unless in the case of a medical emergency. Died in Health Policy (2021) Reproductive Health Care https://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/3fbc9db977620691e7c44fd11af570a6724108dfc454712e374328fbda1810f24ae0ad36780a8b51de22407305ba8523
House Bill 545Prohibits materials that depicts or describes sexual content that lacks serious literary, artistic, political, or scientific value from being used in public schools. Requires parental consent for minors to obtain sex education.Enacted (2021) Sex Education https://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/97902fd39355779ec9190e8bb330f839be835afeee4ebd657730cb04cdb236a255e8ddf9fe6ce4a11a6dd0deacf5c483
House Bill 1221 Prohibits abortion based upon the fetus being diagnosed with or potentially being diagnosed with a disability. Died in Rules (2021) Reproductive Health Care https://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/4a2f5df9b5486633770031c9b6203af340523321e4c18d82032be6d15eda88928f4905488c0510cdddd344c209d9b8c2
House Bill 1303 Requires health education to include instruction on the dangers and signs of human trafficking. Died in Secondary Education & Career Development Subcommittee (2021) Sex Education https://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/7726f38e6746384cde7b03e799ebf2c6dc93eea04fac27b74a515ec8737547e9fdea35a6e3d2fd4763c7c24d62ab1ae5
Senate Bill 690Prohibits mental health professionals from engaging in conversion therapy with minors. Died in Health Policy(2021) Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity https://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/7aef5fc257acc916cf2b8d62607aba8ac2fba5d41274d54b9ee6a9100fcb000df6e57740edbea8a6147424ea9c1d52dc
Senate Bill 410 Prohibits materials that depicts or describes sexual content that lacks serious literary, artistic, political, or scientific value from being used in public schools. Requires parental consent for minors to obtain sex education. Failed (2021) Sex Educationhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/8d51701c7853f37066c9f716e3392df88e49d1e9f69efea202ecd13141ac586ba8e889c32154729855125c83414303ad
Senate Bill 582Enacts the Parents Bill of Rights, which outlines the fundamental rights of a parent to direct the upbringing, education, health care, and mental health of their children. This includes the ability to object to curriculum related to sexuality and the right to remove their child from any sex education instruction. Prohibits health care providers from providing care without parental consent. Failed (2021) Sex Educationhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/740d9892539530972a85c812d2bff2547585a4b46b9386ce758dde20cf07327b8d5864fde757fb8affa8b98626f99ce3
Senate Bill 818 Requires school districts that provide sexuality education to teach comprehensive sex education and requires each regional educational service center to appoint a comprehensive personal health and safety education and comprehensive sexual health education advisory board.Enacted (2021) Sex Education https://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/ab02bb6070a36326c5f4146278249607cac4feac4bce7e909e40909ba89f5ed3ed3a941c7406b34aa1d91cca5c278d58
Senate Bill 1094Requires comprehensive health education to be age appropriate, evidence based, and developmentally appropriate. Requires curriculum to include instruction child sexual abuse, exploitation, and human trafficking. Requires curriculum to include an awareness of the benefits of sexual abstinence as the expected standard and the consequences of teenage pregnancy. Failed (2021) Sex Education https://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/45b68a0ed09940a3295d0e9600f7c9d92411a46056ad5947b3c50d36794d2aae766c2b7cf5b52106fe33ae8ee01ce18c
Senate Bill 1664Prohibits abortion based upon the prenatal diagnosis or screening indicating a disability or potential disability in the fetus. Died in Children, Families, and Elder Affairs (2021) Reproductive Health Care https://s3.amazonaws.com/fn-document-service/file-by-sha384/2f32ecab9a1393fdba0df7f36268ac8558aa8a94acc4cf611f9179b12afb312de7caca500cdc0041f5555ecfd769eca4

Youth Sexual Health Data

Young people are more than their health behaviors and outcomes. While data can be a powerful tool to demonstrate the sex education and sexual health care needs of young people, it is important to be mindful that these behaviors and outcomes are impacted by systemic inequities present in our society that affect an individual’s sexual health and well-being. To learn more about Florida’s Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) results, click here.

Florida School Health Profiles Data 

In 2019, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released the School Health Profiles, which measure school health policies and practices and highlight which health topics were taught in schools across the country. Since the data were collected from self-administered questionnaires completed by schools’ principals and lead health education teachers, the CDC notes that one limitation of the School Health Profiles is bias toward the reporting of more positive policies and practices. In the School Health Profiles, the CDC identifies 20 sexual health education topics as critical for ensuring a young person’s sexual health. Below are key instruction highlights for secondary schools in Florida as reported for the 2017–2018 school year.

Reported teaching all 20 critical sexual health education topics

  • 31.5% of Florida secondary schools taught students all 20 critical sexual health education topics in a required course in any of grades 6, 7, or 8.
  • 50% of Florida secondary schools taught students all 20 critical sexual health education topics in a required course in any of grades 9, 10, 11, or 12.

Reported teaching about the benefits of being sexually abstinent

  • 66.9% of Florida secondary schools taught students about the benefits of being sexually abstinent in a required course in any of grades 6, 7, or 8.
  • 85.6% of Florida secondary schools taught students about the benefits of being sexually abstinent in a required course in any of grades 9, 10, 11, or 12.

Reported teaching how to access valid and reliable information, products, and services related to HIV, other STDs, and pregnancy

  • 63.3% of Florida secondary schools taught students how to access valid and reliable information, products, and services related to HIV, other STDs, and pregnancy in a required course in any of grades 6, 7, or 8.
  • 84.5% of Florida secondary schools taught students how to access valid and reliable information, products, and services related to HIV, other STDs, and pregnancy in a required course in any of grades 9, 10, 11, or 12.

Reported teaching how to create and sustain healthy and respectful relationships

  • 66.7% of Florida secondary schools taught students how to create and sustain healthy and respectful relationships in a required course in any of grades 6, 7, or 8.
  • 88.1% of Florida secondary schools taught students how to create and sustain healthy and respectful relationships in a required course in any of grades 9, 10, 11, or 12.

Reported teaching about preventive care that is necessary to maintain reproductive and sexual health

  • 58.5% of Florida secondary schools taught students about preventive care that is necessary to maintain reproductive and sexual health in a required course in any of grades 6, 7, or 8.
  • 81% of Florida secondary schools taught students about preventive care that is necessary to maintain reproductive and sexual health in a required course in any of grades 9, 10, 11, or 12.

Reported teaching how to correctly use a condom

  • 41.4% of Florida secondary schools taught students how to correctly use a condom in a required course in any of grades 6, 7, or 8.
  • 65.1% of Florida secondary schools taught students how to correctly use a condom in a required course in any of grades 9, 10, 11, or 12.

Reported teaching about methods of contraception other than condoms

  • 47.9% of Florida secondary schools taught students about methods of contraception other than condoms in a required course in any of grades 6, 7, or 8.
  • 73.1% of Florida secondary schools taught students about methods of contraception other than condoms in a required course in any of grades 9, 10, 11, or 12.

Reported teaching about sexual orientation

  • 43.7% of Florida secondary schools taught students about sexual orientation in a required course in any of grades 6, 7, or 8.
  • 63.5% of Florida secondary schools taught students about sexual orientation in a required course in any of grades 9, 10, 11, or 12.

Reported teaching about gender roles, gender identity, or gender expression

  • 42.5% of Florida secondary schools taught students about gender roles, gender identity, or gender expression in a required course in any of grades 6, 7, or 8.
  • 61.7% of Florida secondary schools taught students about gender roles, gender identity, or gender expression in a required course in any of grades 9, 10, 11, or 12.

Reported providing curricula or supplementary materials relevant to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning (LGBTQ) youth

  • 53.4% of Florida secondary schools provided students with curricula or supplementary materials that included HIV, STD, or pregnancy prevention information relevant to LGBTQ youth.

(Visit the CDC’s School Health Profiles report for additional information on school health policies and practices.)

***The quality of sex education taught often reflects funding available for sex education programs. To learn more about federal funding streams, click here.

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